Happy Tuesday everybody!

 

While I’m sure some of us are groaning at the thought about returning to work after that nice long weekend, we are now in September which means cool weather is hopefully just around the corner.

I, for one, cannot wait for scarf and boot season, but I know there are those who dread the changing of the seasons, and for very good reason. People with common respiratory ailments such as Asthma or chronic sinus infections have good reason to approach the season change with apprehension instead of anticipation.

Cold, dry air is a common asthma trigger and can cause bad flare-ups. That’s especially true for people who take part in winter sports or have exercise-induced asthma. What many people don’t know however is that everyone’s asthma is different, so what triggers one person’s asthma may be harmless to another.

Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow and swell and produce extra mucus. This can make breathing difficult and trigger coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. Unfortunately, there are lots of common misconceptions when it comes to asthma and respiratory health.

The most commonly heard asthma myth is that it can be outgrown. While it is treatable, and symptoms can improve as adulthood progresses, asthma is still considered a chronic condition that is controlled differently from person to person.

People with exercise-induced asthma are often led to believe that because they have asthma they should not exercise. However, studies show that regular exercise can promote respiratory and heart health, strengthening those muscles that have been weakened by inflammation. As always it is important to do your own research as well as consult with your trusted physician if you have any concerns regarding your respiratory health.

If you’re looking for a fun new way to promote your respiratory health, then stop by Salt on the Rocks and talk to one of our awesome staff members about doing a Caribbean Salt Session. Halotherapy or salt therapy consists of the inhalation of a dry sodium chloride that is pumped into the air in one of our salt rooms. Breathing that salt in is like taking a scrub brush to your lungs, drying up any built-up mucus and making it easier for you to expel it naturally. For asthma patients salt therapy has been proven to reduce bronchial obstruction in the lungs and improve inflammation of the airways. Go to saltontherockshuntsville.com or stop by and see us to learn more about all the benefits of dry salt therapy.

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